Nigeria IPC Acute Malnutrition Analysis Report (May 2022 – April 2023)

Nigeria Nutrition Sector is delighted to share with you the latest IPC for Acute Malnutrition Analysis Report (May 2022 – April 2023). You can access the full report, its snapshot and previous reports on the IPC website. Full Report Snapshot Key Highlights: Nearly 6 million children aged 0-59 months in Northeast (2.0 million) and Northwest (3.9 million) Nigeria are likely suffering and expected to suffer from acute malnutrition from May 2022 – April 2023. The acutely malnourished children aged 0-59 months include 1.6 million Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) cases (Northeast – 697,000; Northwest – 927,000) and 4.3 million Moderate Acute Malnutrition (MAM) cases (Northeast – 1.3 million; Northwest – 3.0 million). In addition, nearly 512,000 pregnant and lactating women (Northeast – 179,000; Northwest – 333,000) are likely suffering and expected to suffer from acute malnutrition from May 2022 – April 2023. During the lean season (May – September 2022), which corresponds to the period of peak acute malnutrition, 30 of the 63 LGAs analysed in Northeast Nigeria and 42 of the 71 LGAs analysed in Northwest Nigeria were classified in IPC Acute Malnutrition (AMN) Phase 3 and above (Serious or Critical). During the first projection (October – December 2022), which corresponds to the harvest season and period of decreasing acute malnutrition, 25 of the 63 LGAs analysed in Northeast Nigeria and 51 of the 71 LGAs analysed in Northwest Nigeria are likely to be in IPC AMN Phase 3 and above (Serious or Critical). During the second projection (January to April 2023), which corresponds to the post-harvest season and period of low acute malnutrition, 24 of the 63 LGAs analysed in Northeast Nigeria and 48 of the 71 LGAs analysed in Northwest Nigeria are likely to be in IPC AMN Phase 3 and above (Serious or Critical). The key recommendations include, 1) advocacy for funding to maintain access to lifesaving humanitarian assistance (nutrition, WASH, food security and health), especially among IDPs and communities severely impacted by flooding and outbreaks of cholera and measles, and 2) synergies between humanitarian and development programmes to tackle the underlying causes of food insecurity and malnutrition.   Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any feedback or require further information: Northeast Nigeria: jmukisa@unicef.org; nutsectorco-ma@ng-actionagainsthunger.org; ahwaziri@unicef.org; nshehu@unicef.org; ayerima@unicef.org    Northwest Nigeria: eldiop@unicef.org; amahama@unicef.org; tolukemitan@unicef.org; rarasah@unicef.org   

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